Retro futurism! Yes, please.
Some people think going “back to the future” so to speak has the potential to be the “new zombies” or steampunk or whatever. I can’t say yay or nay to that because I don’t determine such things, but I think I would support that. The death of Ray Bradbury may just inspire a new interest in the old-fashioned future, a la EPCOT Center and old Tomorrowland and 1960s Los Angeles.
Truth be told, zombie-related themes don’t really float my steamship, but they’re fun to talk about. I suspect the popularity of zombie walks has something to do with the ease of  mass costuming — just add makeup, fake dirt and a staggering walk. To me, it’s mostly a running joke that in itself parodies a return to past decades, when people pondered the threat of thorny social issues including but not limited to the atom bomb, the Cold War, Communism and McCarthyism. There was definitely a fear of the unknown involved. Maybe that helps to explain why the dead are rising once again?
(via WebUrbanist)

Retro futurism! Yes, please.

Some people think going “back to the future” so to speak has the potential to be the “new zombies” or steampunk or whatever. I can’t say yay or nay to that because I don’t determine such things, but I think I would support that. The death of Ray Bradbury may just inspire a new interest in the old-fashioned future, a la EPCOT Center and old Tomorrowland and 1960s Los Angeles.

Truth be told, zombie-related themes don’t really float my steamship, but they’re fun to talk about. I suspect the popularity of zombie walks has something to do with the ease of  mass costuming — just add makeup, fake dirt and a staggering walk. To me, it’s mostly a running joke that in itself parodies a return to past decades, when people pondered the threat of thorny social issues including but not limited to the atom bomb, the Cold War, Communism and McCarthyism. There was definitely a fear of the unknown involved. Maybe that helps to explain why the dead are rising once again?

(via WebUrbanist)